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Trademark Backley is aiming high

PUBLISHED: 15:48 26 November 2008 | UPDATED: 10:27 12 August 2010

AN OLYMPIC javelin thrower is trade marking his name so he can corner the market in artificial limbs, teeth and eyes. Athlete Steve Backley, 39, from Chislehurst, has registered his name with the UK s Intellectual Property Office so it can be used on ex

AN OLYMPIC javelin thrower is trade marking his name so he can corner the market in artificial limbs, teeth and eyes.

Athlete Steve Backley, 39, from Chislehurst, has registered his name with the UK's Intellectual Property Office so it can be used on exclusive products and services.

His name and logo, a small cartoon javelin thrower, and signature will be used on a range of items including surgical, dental and veterinary instruments as well as artificial limbs, eyes and teeth.

His Trademark will also be used in telecommunications services, chat room services, e-mail services, radio and digital communications.

His personal assistant, Jenny Foster, said: "The reason we have trademarked these items is because Steve is an ambassador to companies which produce them. He is well known and he wanted to protect his name and his signature."

Interested parties, including anyone else with the name Steve Backley, now have three months to object to the application by contacting the UK's Intellectual Property Office, after which it will decide if the mark can be registered.

The former European and Commonwealth Champion and two-time Olympic silver medallist, who is part of the BBC's athletics team, competed in TV's Dancing On Ice show earlier this year despite having had a hip replacement in 2005.

His application also covers orthopaedic articles, suture materials, supportive bandages and furniture adapted for medical use, as well as covering his corporate training, motivational speaking and after-dinner speaking activities which he currently charges between £4,000 and £7,000 for.

Companies and individuals apply to register names and logos as trademarks in order to identify the commercial source or origin of goods and services and set their business and its products apart from those of others.

Trademark owners can enforce their trademarks as a means of preventing others from using identical, or in some cases, similar, names and logos.

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