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Secure hospital launches investigation after convicted paedophile patient brags of using WhatsApp and accessing pornography

PUBLISHED: 17:12 31 May 2017 | UPDATED: 17:12 31 May 2017

Collis sent The Sunday Mirror messages over WhatsApp

Collis sent The Sunday Mirror messages over WhatsApp

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Aaron Collis was moved from prison to the hospital in September 2016

An investigation has been launched by a secure hospital in the Bromley borough, after reports emerged a patient and convicted paedophile has been bragging of using smartphone messaging service WhatsApp and watching pornography from his hospital bed.

Aaron Collis, 31, a former nursery worker jailed for abusing 22 children, was moved from prison to the hospital in September 2016, where he says he’s being treated for a personality disorder.

The Sunday Mirror this weekened reported one of its journalists got in touch with Collis via a website set up to defend him.

He apparently added the journalist on WhatsApp, and had a lengthy conversation.

The paper claims that after speaking with him on the phone and by text, they received a message which read: “Hello it’s Aaron Collis here, this is my WhatsApp account, I got two mobile numbers, double life, double phone numbers lol.”

He reportedly sent the newspaper two pictures of himself, one of his bank card, and another of his driving licence to prove it was him. On the phone, he told the journalist that he can access adult porn using wi-fi.

The hospital itself, which we are not naming, refused to make any comment on any of its patients.

However, it did speak to us about its policy towards patients.

A spokesperson for the hospital said: “We treat people with complex mental health problems who may be involved in the criminal justice system. Wi-fi is not available within the hospital for staff or patients. Depending on patients’ treatment plans, some are provided with limited access to internet for educational purposes, under strict supervision only.

“Patients do not have access to smartphones but are able to use the patients’ landline phone on the ward or, depending on individual treatment plans, mobile phones, which do not have cameras or internet connectivity.

“Should a team member in our medium secure unit find contraband materials, the items would be removed immediately, the incident investigated and restrictions put in place and discussed with the patient.”

Collis was convicted by Cambridge Crown Court in 2009 after gaining access to victims through friendships with their parents.

He used sweets to encourage sexual activity with his victims, the youngest of which was 18-months-old.

He later admitted to further offences, and was taken back to court in 2012.

The Ministry of Justice stated they would not discuss this case as Collis is in the care of the NHS.

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