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Marathon runners conquer the pain barrier for charity

PUBLISHED: 17:32 28 April 2010 | UPDATED: 10:30 12 August 2010

FEELING GOOD: Monica Coyne.

FEELING GOOD: Monica Coyne.

FUNDRAISING runners from the borough have completed the punishing London Marathon and raised thousands of pounds for charity. They joined business impresario Richard Branson, Princess Beatrice and some 37,000 other runners on the 26.2 mile route through

FUNDRAISING runners from the borough have completed the punishing London Marathon and raised thousands of pounds for charity.

They joined business impresario Richard Branson, Princess Beatrice and some 37,000 other runners on the 26.2 mile route through the capital on Sunday.

Kevin Neath, 39, of Armstrong Close, Bickley, completed the course in just over three hours while raising money for the Chartwell Cancer Trust, based at the Princess Royal University Hospital, Farnborough.

He said: "It was very painful, but if even Richard Branson could make the 26 miles, so could I.

"I had to take Monday off work as I couldn't walk properly."

Mr Neath, who was cheered on by his two young children, Molly and Freddie, added: "The crowd was excellent the whole way round."

Also raising money for the Chartwell Cancer Unit on Sunday was 44-year-old Richard Carter, of Borkwood Way, Orpington, whose mother Margaret was successfully treated for advanced lymphoma at the unit.

Mr Carter said: "It was a marvellous day but lots of hard work. It's hard to put into words how I felt at the end, but it's a feeling I will never forget.

"My body was hurting ever such a lot. It was really hard but the will of the supporters and the incentive of Chartwell was enough to get me through." In total, Mr Carter has raised more than £3,000 for the charity.

Monica Coyne, from Beckenham, celebrated her 36th birthday on Sunday as she ran the marathon in four hours 20 minutes, raising £1,200 for Breast Cancer Campaign.

Ms Coyne said: "The last three miles were very hard. At mile 25 I was struggling to keep my eyes open but then I ran into a sea of pink campaign staff cheering me on, which kept me going through the last few hundred yards. No matter how bad I felt I knew it wasn't as bad as chemo."

She decided to run for breast cancer after her mother was diagnosed with the disease twice, and in memory of her friend, Julie Hill, who died of breast cancer in July 2008.

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