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Man is so glad he went to Sightsavers

PUBLISHED: 16:00 13 August 2008 | UPDATED: 09:46 12 August 2010

A MAN who went for a routine eye examination had his eyesight saved after the optometrist spotted a severe problem, writes Kate Nelson. Eric Langran, 46,

A MAN who went for a routine eye examination had his eyesight saved after the optometrist spotted a severe problem, writes Kate Nelson.

Eric Langran, 46, who had not had his eyes examined for many years, visited Specsavers Opticians in West Wickham High Street, where Bamini Raj quickly identified the problem.

Mrs Raj noticed the pressure in Mr Langran's right eye was double the normal size and immediately referred him to the Moorfields eye department at St George's Hospital, Tooting, with suspected acute glaucoma.

Mr Langran said: "I had slightly blurred vision before the appointment but thought that was because I needed reading glasses.

"My wife was getting her eyes tested so I asked her to book me in to see the optometrist. I was knocked back when they told me I would have to go to hospital that day."

His condition was so severe that eye doctors opened a specialist testing room especially for him. Mrs Raj's referral was confirmed and Eric was diagnosed and treated for the optic nerve disease which can lead to blindness.

Mr Langran said: "I am just so grateful that I went for the eye exanimation and they caught this early enough for me to respond well to treatment.

"I now take eye drops and may have to for the rest of my life. The vision in my right eye is still slightly blurred but at least I have it.

"It is down to one eye examination and the expertise of the optometrists that I have my sight."

Glaucoma is often related to a change in the flow of the fluid inside the eye which leads to an increase in the pressure inside the eye and is harmful to the optic nerve.

Damage of this kind is irreversible so early detection is vital in order to prevent further loss of sight.

Some types of glaucoma develop gradually and the sufferer is often unaware of a problem until it is quite severe.

Mrs Raj said: "In the most severe cases, if glaucoma is left untreated it can develop and lead to complete blindness.

"We're glad to have been able to help Eric and hope that this highlights the importance of regular eye examinations at least every two years."

katherine.nelson@archant.co.uk


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