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Pioneering augmented reality system helps prostate cancer patient from Bromley

PUBLISHED: 16:36 18 June 2018 | UPDATED: 16:36 18 June 2018

Bromley patient Ian Titheridge is recovering well. Picture: Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust

Bromley patient Ian Titheridge is recovering well. Picture: Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust

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An innovative technology which allows experts to provide remote assistance to medical teams anywhere in the world has been used for the first time on a Bromley patient.

Warren Lo operating. Pciture: Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation TrustWarren Lo operating. Pciture: Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust

The novel platform known as Proximie was used during part of the robot-assisted procedure, which took place at Guy’s Hospital, Great Maze Pond.

Professor Prokar Dasgupta, consultant urological surgeon at Guy’s, instructed urology registrar Warren Lo through the platform from another part of the trust while he started the robotic procedure to remove the prostate of a man with prostate cancer.

While Warren used the console to control the robot’s movements, Professor Dasgupta’s voice could be heard giving guidance through the platform and his hand could be seen on the screen showing Warren where to make incisions and where to avoid.

Professor Dasgupta was in control of the procedure in the same way he would be if he was in the operating theatre.

The procedure was a first for the trust. Picture: Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation TrustThe procedure was a first for the trust. Picture: Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust

The procedure was live-streamed to him through the platform, which can be uploaded to any device such as a tablet or laptop in any location.

He said: “Proximie is a game changer. It means that irrespective of the patient’s location, they get the best expertise available even in a place where that’s not always possible.

“Ultimately this means that procedures are safer than ever and that patients will receive the best care possible.”

Ian Titheridge, 50, was diagnosed with prostate cancer around seven weeks ago.

It was detected by chance after going to his GP about an injury he had sustained while playing rugby.

Ian, a BT engineer, said: “It was a shock to find out I had it but it was caught early and contained.

“I was told about the technology that would be used – I thought it was amazing that it allowed an expert to lead a surgical procedure taking place in a different location. I hope it makes things easier for people in future.”

Ian was discharged the next day and his recovery is going well.

He aims to be back on the rugby pitch in September.

To find out more about Proximie, visit www.proximie.com and follow Proximie on Twitter at @ProximieAR

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