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Battle of Britain vet George reaches for the skies again

PUBLISHED: 07:00 18 September 2019

Former bomber and Spitfire pilot George Dunn takes to the skies once again. Picture: RAF Benevolent Fund

Former bomber and Spitfire pilot George Dunn takes to the skies once again. Picture: RAF Benevolent Fund

Archant

A 97-year-old Second World War veteran took to the skies over Biggin Hill again, but this time he wasn't at the controls of his bomber, he was a passenger in a sensational Spitfire flight.

Second World War pilot George soars high above the skies of Biggin Hill again as memories flood back. Picture: RAF Benevolent FundSecond World War pilot George soars high above the skies of Biggin Hill again as memories flood back. Picture: RAF Benevolent Fund

It was Battle of Britain Day on Sunday, September 15 and George Dunn was at the famous airfield for an incredible treat.

The RAF Benevolent Fund marked the day with a public appeal to help find 100,000 RAF veterans in urgent need of support.

As the 79th anniversary of the Battle of Britain passed, it was an opportunity for us all to remember "The Few" who defended our skies from July to October 1940.

On that day, 79 years ago, the Luftwaffe embarked on an all-out attack against London and around 1,500 aircraft took part in the air battles which lasted throughout the day.

George was a pilot with Bomber Command during the Second World War, flying Halifax and Mosquito bombers and taking part in 44 missions, including the raid on Peenemunde, known as Operation Hydra.

Following the end of the Second World War, he flew Spitfires for the RAF helping to deliver them to Greece.

Indeed, one of the Spitfires he flew has now been restored and is kept at Biggin Hill.

It was arranged by RAF officer Flt Lt Dan Whatmough to thank George's support of the fund as he attends airshows and book signings, raising thousands.

Air Vice-Marshal David Murray, chief executive of the RAF Benevolent Fund, said: "We must never forget the sacrifices of The Few, without who the Second World War may have turned out very differently.

"They defended Britain at an incredibly perilous time. Many gave their lives, while those who survived were often left physically or mentally scarred.

"Since the Battle of Britain, many other generations have served, including the hundreds of thousands who undertook National Service.

"The youngest of whom is now 75. It is all of our responsibility to help them, in their time of need, so we're asking their friends or relatives to help us encourage them to seek support."

To refer someone to the RAF Benevolent Fund visit www.rafbf.org or phone 0300 102 1919.

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