Search

Dozens of dealers expected in Orpington next month for Kent's largest book fair

PUBLISHED: 12:04 28 October 2015 | UPDATED: 12:04 28 October 2015

FRANKFURT AM MAIN, GERMANY - OCTOBER 13:  An elderly man reads in a  book at a stand of antique books during the Frankfurt Book Fair 2011 on October 13, 2011 in Frankfurt am Main, Germany. This year's edition of the largest book fair in the world takes place from October 12 - 16, and features Iceland as guest of honour.  (Photo by Ralph Orlowski/Getty Images)

FRANKFURT AM MAIN, GERMANY - OCTOBER 13: An elderly man reads in a book at a stand of antique books during the Frankfurt Book Fair 2011 on October 13, 2011 in Frankfurt am Main, Germany. This year's edition of the largest book fair in the world takes place from October 12 - 16, and features Iceland as guest of honour. (Photo by Ralph Orlowski/Getty Images)

2011 Getty Images

The fair will take place from 10am to 3pm in the Crofton Halls on Sunday, November 29.

Bookseller Steve Marshall says he is staging “the largest book fair in Kent” next month in Orpington.

The 69-year-old, who used to run a book shop on the Pantiles in Tunbridge Wells and is no stranger to organising book fairs, says it will boast thousands of books offering something for the casual reader through to the collector.

The fair will take place from 10am to 3pm in the Crofton Halls on Sunday, November 29.

Present will be dozens of dealers from across the country selling thousands of antiquarian and second-hand books, maps and printed ephemera both for the avid reader of ‘real’ books and the specialist collectors.

Mr Marshall, of Hastings Road, Pembury, said: “I’ve put on lots of book fairs in Kent over the years and I run one in Tunbridge Wells four times a year.

“I’m hoping to get about 30 dealers, we’ve got people coming from Norfolk, Brighton and Surrey so it’s not just people in the county showing an interest.

“I spoke to about 15 or 20 dealers I knew in Kent, many of whom come to my Tunbridge Wells fair, and they seemed up for it.

“I put an advert on some websites that I know a lot of dealers and book buyers look at, then word of mouth spreads and now I’ve got 26 confirmed with a few weeks still to go when I fully expect to get a few more.”

Book fairs were once regularly held in the borough but the changing manner in which we consume books has seen them fall off the agenda.

Mr Marshall, a former lawyer who now owns Goudhurst Bookshop, admits competing in the modern era is difficult, but that there are still people with a fond interest in books.

“You simply can’t compete with the internet, and children today are brought up in a completely different environment.

“When I was growing up books were all you had. Now, I get on a train and I’m reading my books while the people around me are on Kindles and iPhones, reading things they’ve downloaded.

“It’s cheaper and more convenient, I accept that, you don’t have to carry cumbersome books around all the time. But there are still a few people - connoisseurs - who like fine binding, the feel and the smell of a book which you just can’t get online, so there’s still demand for books.”

Most Read

Most Read

Latest from the Bromley Times

Hot Jobs

Show Job Lists