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Can loo believe it?

PUBLISHED: 17:01 22 July 2009 | UPDATED: 10:57 12 August 2010

THREE adventurers set off on the trip of a lifetime to Mongolia in a taxi with a toilet welded to the back of it. Commercial director Sean Mullins, 31, of Southborough Lane, Bickley, and his two school friends, doctor Mark Tucker, 33, and businessman Ma

THREE adventurers set off on the trip of a lifetime to Mongolia in a taxi with a toilet welded to the back of it.

Commercial director Sean Mullins, 31, of Southborough Lane, Bickley, and his two school friends, doctor Mark Tucker, 33, and businessman Mark Elliot, 31, set off from Goodwood last Saturday on a daredevil journey through some of the most treacherous and remote places on earth.

The men will travel through 20 countries, four deserts and 11 mountain ranges before arriving in Mongolia in about a month's time.

Mr Mullins said: "We are taking a southern route which is the most difficult, equipped solely with a compass, passports and a map. We don't have Sat Nav. We are doing it in a car that is known for its longevity but has already clocked up a distance three times the circumference of the planet."

Some 500 people plan to accomplish the Mongol Rally challenge which must be completed in a vehicle less than 1000cc without any assistance or back up. None of the men have mechanical knowledge.

Months of preparation have gone in to transforming the taxi, which now features a dummy straddling a fully functioning toilet on the back which is sure to turn the heads of the countrymen they pass.

Mr Mullins added: "We intend on pushing the boundaries of a true British icon, and add a flavour of humour by driving through the old eastern bloc countries as well as Turkey, Georgia, Turkmenistan and Russia in a car that is bound to attract far more attention than we'd like. Things are bound to get interesting, or go wrong."

They will drive over one of the most dangerous roads in the world, the Pamir Highway, negotiate with border guards and pitch their tent wherever they can.

The trio still hope to cross Iran but are aware that could prove difficult in light of the civil unrest caused by the elections last month.

Participants must devise their own route and a warning on the Mogol Rally website reads: "These adventures are genuinely dangerous things to do...you can not underestimate the risks involved in undertaking this kind of adventure. Your chance of dying can be very high, some past teams have been seriously injured.

"These adventures are not a glorified holiday. They are an adventure and so by their very nature extremely risky. You really are on your own. If it all goes wrong, that's it, tough."

The men will donate the converted cab to charity upon arrival in Mongolia. They are completing the mission in aid of the Christina Noble Children's Foundation and Mercy Corps and hope to raise £5,000.

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