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Bromley athletes look back at Olympic achivements one year after London games

PUBLISHED: 13:32 25 July 2013 | UPDATED: 13:32 25 July 2013

Great Britain's Adam Gemili (centre) in action with Jamaica's Yohann Blake (right) and Bahamas Derrick Atkins (left) in the men's 100m at the London Olympics

Great Britain's Adam Gemili (centre) in action with Jamaica's Yohann Blake (right) and Bahamas Derrick Atkins (left) in the men's 100m at the London Olympics

PA Wire/Press Association Images

A year on from the Olympics in London, we take a look at the local legacy and catch up with some of the Bromley athletes that represented the borough in front of the world.

Great Britain's Scott Overall after finishing the men's marathon in London. Picture: Mike Egerton/PA WireGreat Britain's Scott Overall after finishing the men's marathon in London. Picture: Mike Egerton/PA Wire

Bromley and Blackheath Harriers sprinter Adam Gemili burst on to the scene in the Olympics – despite only concentrating on athletics full-time at the start of last year, he came within four one hundredths of a second from reaching the 100m final.

It’s been a really busy year. Surreal would be a good way to put it, with people wanting to talk to me, getting a lot of attention and being at the start line next to the likes of Usain Bolt and Yohan Blake.

Great Britain's Sean King was part of the first British men's water polo team at the Olympics in 50 years.Great Britain's Sean King was part of the first British men's water polo team at the Olympics in 50 years.

I appreciate the support but I try to stay humble and grounded. These superstars are lovely people, genuine with no airs or graces.

I’ll be competing in the 200m and not the 100m in the World Championships in Moscow next month, so my aim will be to reach the final, set a new personal best and then go from there.

The plan this year was always to be an all-round sprinter rather than a 100m specialist so I’m looking forward to it.

As well as the athletics I’m studying for a degree in sports and exercise science at the University of East London, so I’m still living at home because I don’t think I’d be able to handle everything if I moved out and I love spending time with my family.

The Rio Olympics are a long way off but I’m ambitious and want to challenge for medals. First I need to break the 10 second barrier in the 100m.

Scott Overall, 30, is a Blackheath & Bromley Harriers marathon runner. He represented Team GB over 26.2 miles in London last summer.

The Olympics marathon was great. The crowds that turned out on that Sunday was amazing.

It was one of the hottest days of the year, which wasn’t conducive for running – but great for watching. It was just unreal, especially for those wearing the Team GB vests because the noise level would double as we came through.

My ears were ringing when I finished.

I don’t get the chance to run in Norman Park very much, but I do turn out for Blackheath & Bromley Harriers when I still can. It’s a great club with a very long history of sending people to championships. It’s nice to part of that.

The powers that be take three guys to the Olympics for the marathon. I’m still learning how to run it and hopefully I can qualify for Rio. By that time I think Mo Farah will have stepped up to that distance.

But I don’t begrudge him a spot, we’re very good friends and I was an usher at his wedding.

The Olympics definitely raised the profile of athletics, but it goes on all year round – not just every four years.

Sean King, 24, was part of the Team GB water polo squad that competed at an Olympic Games last summer for the first time in 50 years.

My greatest memory is the opening ceremony, I just remember the flashing lights and deafening noise.

We had to queue for about four hours to get into the stadium, so for the first hour we were all buzzing but by the time we got in it there was just a sense of relief.

As soon as we stepped out, it was incredible. I have never felt anything like it.

We achieved a lot at the games for British water polo, and it speaks for itself that we were the first team to represent the nation at an Olympic Games for 50 years.

I think participation levels have grown greatly, and I have certainly found people know more about it.

It’s going to be difficult to get to Rio as we haven’t received funding. We’re hopeful of at least reaching the qualifying round.

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