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A mystery trail

PUBLISHED: 10:34 11 June 2009 | UPDATED: 09:40 12 August 2010

The APoH statement published the day after the meeting at which they claimed 100 clinicians agreed A&E services should be streamlined stated: Clear recommendations for the future shape of hospital services in outer South East London have emerged from a

The APoH statement published the day after the meeting at which they claimed 100 clinicians agreed A&E services should be streamlined stated:

Clear recommendations for the future shape of hospital services in outer South East London have emerged from a workshop involving more than 100 clinicians from hospitals in Bromley, Greenwich, Lewisham and Sidcup.

However, APoH later admitted: "As you know, it was discovered that there is no comprehensive and validated list of those who attended the workshops." AND "...no formal register was taken" AND"I did believe...that the note taker was making an informal record of attendees but, having reviewed the files, I now realise this was not the case. Please accept my apologies for this."

The press release also said:

The result of this workshop was a high level of consensus that they would prefer to concentrate specialist services on two main sites in outer South East London.

BUT- There are NO documents to support this

APoH does not know what METHOD it used to collate clinicians' views. APoH does not have ANY MINUTES from the meeting. APoH can only prove it invited SEVEN people from QMS

It continued:

The aim of their recommendation was to improve patient safety, and ensure that all specialist units would see enough patients per year to achieve better results.

In December 2007, the Princess Royal University Hospital, Farnborough (PRUH) had to CLOSE its A&E department to all incoming ambulances for three hours. In February 2008, the PRUH was given a improvement notice by the Healthcare Commission (HC) and in June 2008, the Times revealed ambulance admissions had to be diverted from the PRUH and Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Woolwich (QEH) three times each in 2007. But A&E departments at QMS and Lewisham hadn't needed to divert services since 2005 despite dealing with nearly 400 more emergencies in the same period.

It concluded:

The workshop was one part of the process for developing options for a full public consultation later in the year.

The public consultation was deemed a 'fiasco' by hundreds of residents who could not understand the documents.

And finally: No decision has been made upon which sites to locate services. But the Times was told by one consultant that it was "assumed" at the meeting that QMS would lose its A&E.

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