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Penguins director marches on with fox fun

PUBLISHED: 17:41 06 August 2008 | UPDATED: 17:10 16 August 2010

MARCH of the Penguins director Luc Jacquet swaps feathers for fur and fact for fiction with this charming modern day fairytale of a friendship which develops between a little girl and a young female fox.

THE FOX AND THE CHILD

Cert U

MARCH of the Penguins director Luc Jacquet swaps feathers for fur and fact for fiction with this charming modern day fairytale of a friendship which develops between a little girl and a young female fox.

The nameless redhead, played by Bertille Noel-Bruneau, spends most of her time daydreaming in her rural cottage home when she comes across a fox on her way back from school

one day. The meeting doesn't last long but sticks in the girl's head long after the two have parted company.

She later tries to find the fox again, but ends up confined to her bed after breaking her leg while trudging though the deep snow. When the spring comes, she tries to hunt down the fox once more, and this time succeeds in finding the animal who now has a clutch of newly-born cubs.

The two quickly become close, but the friendship is threatened when the girl attempts to domesticate the animal.

Aimed squarely at the child market, the story is simple and easy to follow especially due to the narration by Isabelle Carré as the now grown-up girl, which occasionally gets in the way by unnecessarily explaining the onscreen action. There are some stunningly put together shots of the vast sweeping landscapes and almost magical forests.

As to be expected - given Jacquet's earlier work - the footage of the animals is first class.

More a series of lush images than a narrative driven piece, the film has a gentle dreamy quality that makes it feel like a live action bed-time story.

* The Child and the Fox opens in cinemas on August 8.

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