Search

GCSE results tables slated as league of wealth’

PUBLISHED: 16:20 16 January 2008 | UPDATED: 11:27 01 July 2010

A HEADTEACHER has blasted the latest set of GCSE league tables for providing a map of wealth distribution. Last year s GCSE results, released last Thursday, showed that a third of Erith School students achieved five A* to C grades including English and m

A HEADTEACHER has blasted the latest set of GCSE league tables for providing a map of wealth distribution.

Last year's GCSE results, released last Thursday, showed that a third of Erith School students achieved five A* to C grades including English and maths.

The national average for attaining these grades is 46.7 per cent, yet the school this week received an outstanding December Ofsted report.

Headteacher Toby Hufford said: "We cannot be national average because we don't have a national average intake. The grammar schools take the top pupils.

"A league table tells you the distribution of wealth in an area. It's about class."

Mr Hufford said most of his 2,018 pupils achieved beyond expectations of them which also disproved claims that large schools curb pupils' success.

He said Bexley's selective school system would always leave pupils divided in their ability.

He added: "While I don't want to get into the philosophy of having grammar schools, if you divide children into sheep and goats you will get sheep and goats."

Bromley council, which also has a grammar school system, reported that three of its schools came in the top 25 per cent nationally in terms of pupils exceeding their expectations.

A council spokesman said: "It shows that there is a huge value added element of what goes on in our schools."

The 2007 GCSE results also show that Greenwich's schools fell below the national average with 34 per cent of pupils attaining five A* to C grades including English and maths.

In Bexley 49.7 per cent of students made these grades and in Bromley 55.3 per cent attained them.

Greenwich's truancy rates were also over twice those of Bexley and Bromley and were the sixth worst in the country.

Spencer Drury, leader of the opposition on Greenwich council, said the council should encourage more academies and keep school sizes down.

He added: "It seems very clear that when the council decides to close a school and leave it alone, the school gets much better.

"We generally think that the Labour council is a negative force and schools do better without it."

The borough's results have been on average 12 per cent below the national average since 2004.

A spokesman for Greenwich council said the results were below expectations but were still an improvement on last year's.

He added: "This improvement is not coming swiftly enough and the council and schools are taking robust action to ensure that results this summer will show significant improvement."

jules.cooper@archant.co.uk

0 comments

Latest news

Yesterday, 15:51

Nugent Shopping Centre recently treated members of the Bromley Childhood Cancer Support Group to a VIP morning.

Yesterday, 15:17

Two Bromley boxers made their debut on the MTK show in Brentwood last week (November 17) with successful performances.

Yesterday, 14:09

Detectives investigating the fatal stabbing of 22-year-old Ayodeji Habeeb Azeez have arrested a fifth person.

Yesterday, 07:00

A resident at an Orpington care home has been reunited with his former primary school class after asking the community if they recognised faces from a 1950s photograph.

Mon, 16:46

London City Royals coach Jay Williams has called for his men to hammer Newcastle Eagles into the ground in a no-nonsense bid for revenge on Saturday.

Mon, 12:54

Huge crowds started their Christmas countdown in Orpington High Street on Thursday (November 15) as the annual Christmas lights switch-on took place.

Most read

Digital Edition

Image
Read the Bromley Times e-edition today
E-edition

Newsletter Sign Up

Bromley Times twice-weekly newsletter
Sign up to receive our regular email newsletter

Our Privacy Policy

Show Job Lists

Family Notices 24